Thursday, August 28, 2014

END OF SUMMER SALE!




We won't promise you that any of this stuff will aid you in back-to-school preparation...  unless loud music helps in that department.

OK, it's on. The end of Summer sale is going from now til Sept. 1st. 20% off in the store when you use the code 'SUMMERBUMMER'. U.S. customers only please, shipping is too friggin' expensive. New stuff added to the store as well and all orders come with free goods! Do it! http://hexrecords.bigcartel.com/

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

INTERVIEW: TONY WEINBENDER (FEST)


Gainesville Fest.  Or just simply known as Fest.  It needs no special title.  People know what it is.  The first year that I went I piled into a rented minivan with six other friends, some of which I barely knew.  My name was on the rental because I was the only one old enough to rent a car.  We drove straight from New York to Florida.  It took about 20 hours and I think I did about 12 hours straight driving for no good reason other than being a determined road warrior.  I was afraid of an entire town drowned in beer and the accompanying annoyance that comes with being a straight edge guy amongst hordes of drunk people.  But I had to admit, that year (and every year since) people at Fest have been nothing short of awesome.  That’s the great thing about Fest- 5,000 people from everywhere take over a small college town and appreciate that they’re wearing shorts, watching punk bands, and having fun in the sun on the cusp of Winter.  How could that put anyone in a bad mood?
After communicating via e-mail for a few years with organizer Tony Weinbender about press stuff he suggested a phone call for this interview.  Truly a pre-internet dude at heart.  I furiously scribbled as he talked so he will have to forgive me if I paraphrased some answers slightly, or just edited out bits because my hand cramped up.
Before getting to the actual questions Tony went into his history of growing up in Roanoke, Virginia and making punk connections the old-fashioned way:  go to shows out of town, play in a band, meet people face to face, remember those people, play their town, and have them play in yours.  From connecting with regional heroes Avail, to founding the MacRock Fest in Harrisonburg, to moving to Florida and becoming a full-time roadie for Less Than Jake, to working in-house at No Idea Records, and eventually establishing Fest, and it growing to be one of the biggest and best punk events in the U.S. (13 years running!) Tony has come a long way.  Here’s what transpired of our lengthy conversation.



What do you think separates Gainesville Fest from other fests happening around the U.S.?

It’s definitely different.  When we grew up there seemed to be more of a format with various fests.  More of the underground hardcore and punk that came from the DIY culture would all gather in one big venue for the whole day or weekend, which could get kind of dull, just hanging out in this one building all day.  But when I lived in Virginia and put together the MacRock festivals I applied something I learned from going to CMJ in NYC, and that was using multiple venues.  So when I did end moving to Gainesville and eventually putting together Fest I wanted to have multiple venues.  It’s something different, ya know?  I also wanted to have a lot of diversity of bands that played, different styles of music.  That way, you have a hardcore band playing in one venue at the same time that a punk band is playing at a venue next door.  It gives the attendees the power, instead of just sitting in one venue all day, waiting for whatever bands you wanted to see.  With Fest I wanted to do this fun and exciting thing for people and to be able to help my friends who were in bands.  Ya know, give these bands some exposure.  I mean, it might even be a big thing, but with certain bands, especially smaller ones, if they play Fest it could really do wonders for their band.
            Also, I think, with Fest, it’s this huge community, like a family sort of thing.  People travel from all over the world for it and we all get together to enjoy this thing.  I think that is part of what separates us from other fests happening.
            It seems like the popular format for a lot of fests to follow is to have one big venue with multiple stages and it doesn’t always feel like a real community sort of thing to me.  With Fest we’ve got these messageboards, and facebook groups, and other things where people just spend the whole year talking about Fest.  It’s weird.  It’s almost like a con.

A con?  Like a scam?

No, like a comic con.  Like San Diego Comic Con, ya know?  The people who are into those sorts of things just create this whole world around it and talk about it all year, ya know?  Fest has people following it like that.  It’s weird.  When we first started doing it we used to call it a family reunion because so many of our friends and friends bands would all get together this one weekend of the year to be here and hang out.  Some times I take for granted that what we do is really awesome.

Do you go to other fests and get a feel for what they do, and maybe apply it to Gainesville Fest?

Well, a lot of the fests I’ve gone to over the last several years have been smaller.  I don’t go to the bigger ones really because you’re usually stuck at one venue the whole time and I don’t really care for that.  But I like to go to Best Friends Day up in Richmond because I’m from Virginia and a lot of the bands I like and am friends with end up playing.  I also went to Insubordination Fest and that was a lot of fun.  I like the smaller fests because I can actually hang out at them.  I can’t really do that at Fest because I’m generally too busy running things.
            I will say, though, that Fun Fun Fun Fest in Austin was really great.  They have a different format than we do, but the guys who put it together- we’re all cut from the same cloth.  Because of Austin being the type of town that it is they can do things on a much grander scale than we can.  But the organizers really open their arms to us at Fest.  It’s like a big fiesta there.  It’s really cool to see people from our scene do really huge things.  Like, they just did Slayer!  But they’ll still make room to have a band like Joyce Manor play, and then still book smaller shows throughout the year.  Those guys who book FFF Fest come from the DIY scene.  One of them is involved with Chaos In Tejas and that’s a really cool Fest as well that uses multiple venues.  And the best part is Austin is cool with it.  They’re used to stuff like that happening.

I know Fest is a job throughout the year for you, but when do you generally start planning each year’s event?

Well, Fest always happens at the end of October.  So for a couple weeks after it happens I basically do clean up for a couple weeks afterwards.  Most of that is paying bands who took off before they were able to get paid, or forget to come by the office and get paid.  So I’m tying up loose ends with that stuff, and a lot of accounting things.  Lots of little details.  Curtis, who does Best Friends Day, is actually a certified CPA, so he comes down and helps out on that end.
            So after that is Thanksgiving, and then Christmas, and I generally hang out with family during that time.  We usually get started in January.  That’s when I begin talking to venues and get their feedback and ideas about what was working for them, or not working for them, during Fest.  It gives them a couple months to reflect on it, and we just work out how to proceed with next year’s Fest.  I like to get all that stuff cleared up early.
            I really don’t have a lot of vacation.  Thanksgiving and December, that’s about it.

How many people do you have on staff to help you, not counting the couple hundred volunteers you have every year?

I’m actually the only full time person on the payroll.  Sarah Goodwin has worked on Fest for the last four or five years.  She started interning with basically no experience, but picked things up really quick.  She does a lot of contact with bands after I book them, produce the guidebooks- that big book we make every year, and she uploads stuff to the site.  Last year we had another person named Sara intern as well, and she has moved up to dealing with sponsors, hotels, and social media stuff.  Rich (Mineo, Horsebites) does our artwork.  Ted Barnes does all our layout stuff.  Steve Wocziack does our website.  They all live in different states.  Lots of people help out with volunteering, and now some of them get paid to do other random stuff, like video work.  We can all work through the internet.  That never used to be the case.  I’ve actually never met Ted Barnes in person, but he’s done work for us for years.  It’s a small group of people overall.  But then the week before Fest a lot of friends come into town to do work, like sound guys.  They all make the whole circus run.


Are there bands that you approach every year about playing, but for one reason or another they cannot play?  And by that I mean dream lineup type bands?

For years it was the Descendents, but this year they are finally playing.  The Descendents happened this year.  I generally try to keep it interesting and add a lot of new bands.  But I’ve always wanted to have the Murder City Devils, the Weakerthans, and Superchunk play, but it never works out.  It’s not even a money thing.  It’s usually just scheduling.  I wanted Big Business to play, but it couldn’t happen because they’re going to Europe or something.

So you got The Melvins instead!

Right!  But yeah, it generally comes down to scheduling and I can’t blame anyone for that.  There have been bands who dropped off because they got offered a spot on some big tour instead.  You got to go for that, ya know?  If we asked some band to play, and they couldn’t because they were going to Europe and feel bad about it, it’s like, ‘go to Europe.  That opportunity does not always come around’.
            But as far as dream list goes it gets smaller and smaller, as we’ve had a lot of bands we’ve always wanted to play already play.  But things will always pop up.  Bands will get back together and do some shows that you wouldn’t expect.  This year it was Mineral, and I’m really excited that they’re playing.  At this point we have a bit of sway and have been able to re-unite some bands, like we’re waving some magic wand.

Such as?

A few years ago Seaweed played.  That was incredible.  Last year it was Knapsack.  Getting Snuff to come out one year was a dream come true.  Getting From Ashes Rise was a big deal because when they were around they never came down this way.  And a lot of these bands are down for it because it’s not some big deal where there’s a big backstage for bands.  They hang out in the street with everyone else.  Most bands are really into that idea.  Some like having a backstage, but for the most part, that’s part of the appeal of the bigger bands we get- they like the idea of everyone just hanging out together.

Playing off of that, are there bands you’d like to have play that you know just wouldn’t mesh with what was going on at Fest?

I do like diversifying the lineup.  I’d like to diversify it even more.  But I think it would hurt things at this point if we were to diversify it even more.  A few years back we put on the Harvest Of Hope Fest and at that we were able to diversify it more.  We could have hip-hop groups play, but it wouldn’t work at Fest even though I love hip-hop and grew up with it.  I wouldn’t ever have something like DJ’s, or trip-hop bullshit.  But I do like the more indie hip-hop stuff, and wouldn’t mind venturing into that.
            Overall, I think my taste in music is representative of what Fest is.  That’s what I like.  I’m 38, but I still get goosebumps when I hear Avail.  I know it sounds corny, but I love that there’s an ‘emo revival’ happening with a lot of bands now.  I really liked all those bands.  I think labels like Top Shelf and Tiny Engines, who are putting out new bands that sound like old bands, like Prawn, are great.  I mean, they just released a new Braid record!  That was huge for me when we got them to play Fest.

So, switching gears, what’s the most difficult part of putting together Fest every year?

I’m a very organized person.  I’m a go-getter.  I work very hard at this every year, and put a lot of time in.  So it drives me nuts when people muck up the works, like city municipalities.  They’re not used to what we do.  When people talk about ‘red tape’ and ‘jumping through hoops’- it’s really true.  The smallest things can be really tough.  It would be great if there was just one person who oversaw everything.  But instead you have to go through a bunch of different people for different things associated with codes and whatever, and then you call that person, and they shuffle you around to someone else.  The buerocracy of it is nuts.

It sounds like the plot of a Parks and Recreation episode.

It’s just like Parks and Rec and I’m Leslie Knoppe.  It’s like the people in the beurocracy just don’t want to work.  They just want to sit around.  They don’t understand that people outside of government want to do things, and have a deadline for doing them.
            I know I make them sound bad, but most of these people are nice, they just don’t get what we’re doing.  Of all the groups we have to deal with I have to admit that the police have been the nicest.  They will go to bat for us.  They have stood up for us at city hall and talked us up.  They’re the ones who see the attendees at Fest every year and see that they’re great people, not city council members.  And out of all the people we go through in the city for Fest we tax the cops time the most, and they’re the ones who end up helping us the most.
            Another thing that can be difficult are some businesses that can be slack.  It used to be more of an issue, like old venues that aren’t around anymore.  We’d talk to them months ahead of time and then they’d just shut down right before Fest.  


Related to that, unlike some other fests that take place in large cities- like CMJ in NYC and FFF Fest in Austin- Fest takes place in a pretty small city and I’d imagine you probably have a significant relationship with the city that might be outside the norm?

Honestly, if Fest took place in a bigger city I think it would be a lot easier because bigger cities have things in place for bigger events like this, as they are more used to large events.  They have the facilities in place.  Gainesville doesn’t necessary have all those facilities in place.  But after Fest 10 the city seemed to realize, ‘oh shit- a lot of people come here, we need to check in on this’.  They could have been real bad about it, but we have a fairly good relationship with the city.  In the past we never had to worry about fire certification.  But now the fire marshal shows up and is asking about banners that bands hang on the stage.  I end up having to call the manufacturer of the banner and ask if they’re fire resistant.  They have no idea.  They’re made of vinyl, how should I know?  It’s weird little things like that.  I’m like the lobbyist for Fest.  But I can’t complain, ya know?
            A place like Austin though, they get it.  In Gainesville, at first, the venues were hard to have get on board.  They would charge me for everything, even though we were the ones doing all the work throughout the weekend.  I didn’t get it at first.  But I know a lot more now.  I guess the biggest benefit of Gainesville is that it is a small city and there is definitely a community vibe here.  And also doing pre-Fest in Tampa has been great.  Dealing with some of the venues there has been great.  It’s different.

That leads me to my last question- why pre-Fest?  Why add more days to the Fest in a different city?

There’s a few reasons.  First, our PBR rep (PBR sponsors much of Fest) lives in Tampa.  They pushed us to do something there.  And the venues were really cool.  The initial idea was to do a spin-off of Fest, like in the Spring.  We could do more of a variety of bands, like metal and hip-hop.  It would have been like Harvest Of Hope, just without the camping.  The camping bit of that fest was terrible.  I’ll never touch that shit again.
            Secondly, Tampa made sense because more and more people were flying into Fest early every year so we thought we’d give them something to do.  We had pre-Fest shows in Gainesville that were selling out, like on the Tuesday and Wednesday before Fest.  Plus, for most people it’s cheaper to fly into Tampa than Gainesville and a lot of people were doing that anyways.  The venues in Tampa are bigger as well.  So we thought we’d try it out.  It was comfortable.  We had 668 people buy passes last year for it, before people even came to the door just buy a ticket.  It wasn’t great.  We lost a little bit of money, but we could afford it.  It was nothing drastic.  It was definitely worth it.  As of now, we’ve already sold more passes than last year, so we’re on track to do pretty well with it.
            But we just try to put on the best production that we can do and the people who do come out give it good reviews.  People talk about it.  People last year were bragging about it.  Ybor is a cool city to hang out in.  It felt like the early years of Fest.  So I think it’s working.
            At the end of the day though, if doing Fest sucks more than working a regular day job than I’ll stop doing it.

Gainesville Fest runs from October 31st- November 2nd this year.  Pre-Fest in Tampa/Ybor City is October 29th and 30th.  Get info on the insane amount of wild bands playing, as well as passes, here:

Tuesday, August 5, 2014

SUMMER KEEPS ROLLING AND SO DO THE REVIEWS

Somehow it has already skipped to August.  Yesterday it might as well have been February.  Where does the time go?  Oh, I know...  fiending over hordes of records in the never-ending quest for that perfect one!  But in all honesty, yeah, I listen to a lot of stuff.  Here's the latest batch, including a couple year-end contenders in that pile.


BREADWINNER, “Burner” LP
I’m a good 20 years late to the game here, but this re-issued LP collection from these early 90’s Richmond trailblazers is pretty wild when put into a historical perspective.  This was one of the harder-to-find Record Store Day releases this year, and not because it sold out quickly.  I think it’s more because most places didn’t bother to carry it due to the obscure nature of the band.  Breadwinner was a band’s band in the strictest sense and I say that because basically anyone who does talk about this band is a musician themselves and cites them as strong influences.  Their output was minimal (a couple 7”s), their tenure was brief, but in 1991 some brilliant dudes down in Virginia were mixing up mostly instrumental and metallic-leaning noise rock with math rock and serving it up to what I’m sure amounted to a small handful of dedicated noiseniks (as these things tend to go).  While listening to it now it feels a bit tepid, maybe not terribly adventurous, but like I stated earlier, when put into the context of this being done over 20 years ago, when styles such as this were quite nascent, it makes it seem like kind of a big deal.  Indie giant Merge re-issued this stuff into a cool package and it clocks in at only around 20 minutes, but worth investigating for the history.  (Merge)

EVERY TIME I DIE, “From Parts Unknown”
How does a band on it’s seventh LP keep things interesting?  It gets tougher with time.  ETID really brought back a raw, vicious intensity on “Ex-Lives”.  I’m not sure what it was about that record, but it’s some of the best stuff they ever did.  On “From Parts Unknown” it feels like some of that revived intensity is lacking and some of it feels rushed, though I will say that opening your record with the lyrics “blow your fucking brains out” over and over again is a pretty good way to start.  The first half is incredibly fast, and has the lion’s share of ripping cuts.  A-side closer “Moor” might be the most interesting song on the record, going with an obtuse piano thud at the beginning and end, which is fairly adventurous.  The B-side, though, accounts for a lot of filler.  The exceptions being the ending of “El Dorado” that summons up a massive Down-styled riff and Keith Buckley’s sing-along worthy chant of “crush your allies!”  (take that Hatebreed!), and “Idiot” with it’s harkening back to some “Hot Damn” styled riffy metalcore.  As always, Buckley, while occasionally overtly wordy, is a deft lyricist and comes up with some great wordplay.  Again, not a bad effort (the Mastodon-meets-hipster cover art is pretty awful though), and certainly an overall fun listen, but not the band’s defining moment.  (Epitaph)

FUCKED UP, “Glass Boys”
The first song has a great drum intro and could be a perfect sample for some late 80’s hip-hop group.  But “Glass Boys” doesn’t have the ambition or grand ideas put forth on previous records, even though the lyrics are excellent as always.  Also, this record is shorter overall from past efforts (some people would cite that as a positive).  The record is bookended by a couple great songs expounding on the query of getting to be an old punker and not connecting with youth the way you once did (I can relate).  J. Mascis lending back up vocals to “Led By Hand”, which sounds kind of like a Dino Jr song anyway, is the other great track on this record.  Still, there is a good deal of what amounts to filler on this outing.  At this point the only thing, soundwise, truly connecting Fucked Up to hardcore is Pink Eye’s gravelly bark.  It’s definitely their slowest and most abundantly melodic work to date.  But, I’m more partial to “Hidden World” and “David Comes To Life”.  (Matador)

GREYS, “If Anything”
So here’s an easy contender for record of the year for me.  After hearing snippets of promising material from previous hard-to-find releases Toronto’s Greys lays down a hell of an LP.  Imagine Nirvana covering Drive Like Jehu, getting noisy, raw, and still having a wild hair for weird guitar antics.  That pique your interest yet?  I know I’m stoked.  They have a lot in common with fellow countrymen in Metz in terms of sound and presentation, but Greys seems to put a bit more dynamics into their songs.  For an idea of how this band sounds I’ll refer to a great live picture on the insert of the record where a member of the band is riding his guitar like a surfboard on a stage monitor while another member kicks out the jams, a couple people in the audience cheering and smiling, and yet another person in the crowd holds his hands over his mouth agape, eyes as wide as dinner plates at the stage antics playing out before him.  That’s a sign of an awesome band and one hell of a kick-ass record.  Necessary.  (Car Park Records)

HERO DISHONEST,Kaikki Hajoaa” 7”
You may listen to this and have the passing thought of what people who have no clue about hardcore music often think about this type of music- “you can’t understand what they’re saying!”  Well, yes, some of the vocals on this 7” are downright terrible.  But the dude is also singing in Finnish, so there’s that if you can’t figure what he’s yelling about.  The music is mostly straight ahead hardcore punk, perfect for basement stomping.  Some of it is mid-tempo, some of it is very fast.  I think the third song on here is a cover, and honestly, I think I like it the best. The rest does not really faze me.  (Peterwalkee Records)

MOUTHEATER, “Passing Key”
Another year-end favorite is rearing it’s ugly head to muscle in on other records vying for a spot.  Fuck those other records.  Moutheater have been cranking out grungy, dirty, mean-spirited noisecore for the last seven years or so and this is their first record in over three years.  I think it’s high time they once again secured their place at (or near) the top of the heap.  But what’s this?  There are several songs that dabble in catchy riffing and almost sung vocals that strongly suggest an older Queens Of the Stone Age influence coming on.  While it is a surprise I can easily hang with that, especially when the rest of this monster is doused in unabashed Unsane love and unstoppable face-mashing riffs.  If you see this band and you are not hurling empty beer (or other beverage) cans everywhere while punching holes into drywall you have seriously not listened to this correctly…  or you just have a lot of respect for venues.  At the very least you will think heavily about doing those things, and then later on you’ll set fire to a dumpster or something.  Get this now and play until it melts your turn table.  (Anthems Of the Undesirable)

SOKEA PISTE, “Valikasi” 12"
Dark goth-y punk.  It leans more on the punk than it does on Bauhaus, but I’m sure the love is there.  The entire record is sung in Finnish, but the lyric sheet has translations (the songs are about things punk-related…  for real) for us cretins who only speak a single language (and sometimes not even coherently).  Regardless, get ready for chilly vibes, driving punk nihilism, and a cold sense of melody on top.  These songs also feel a bit lengthy, but I guess that’s their way of pulling you in.  For one reason or another I’m sort of reminded of PiL, if it were a little more crusty and less refined.  (Peterwalkee Records)

SPIT SPEWING SNAKES, “Steady Sinking Stone” 7”
This Michigan-area band cranks out 5 songs on a single-sided 7” with some insane screen printing on the B-side.  I’m reminded of early Ceremony, as it’s nearly power violence speed, but still catchy and fun, while being aggressive and smart all at once.  For some reason they decided to do an AFI cover on here too.  I think that band’s for the birds, and I have no clue if SSS is doing their own version of it, but it’s really damn fast too.  This thing is packed with extra goodies (poster, stickers, good design, etc), so if you like your records to be more than music this is obviously a pretty good place to start.  (Dropping Bombs)

Thursday, July 24, 2014

INTERVIEW- JOE MCKAY/ THIS IS HARDCORE FEST

I thought it might be a fun idea to talk with a couple people who organize fests around the US.  A long time ago I booked a couple fests here in Syracuse and it made me want to rip all the hair I had on my head at the time right out.  I don't know how others manage to do this and consistently make it a quality event.
I'm starting with Joe Hardcore, who is the main fellow behind This Is Hardcore Fest in Philly.  Yeah, it might seem a little weird for this site to cover that particular fest, but honestly every year I see the lineup and it looks incredible.  And every year I find myself being unable to attend.  Some year I'll make it happen.  This year's event (which actually kicks off today!) looks just as awesome with bands like Converge, Slapshot, All Else Failed, and Turmoil all playing the same day.  Guuuuuuhhhhh (sorry, wiping away the drool).  So anyway, read on about what goes into this monster event and how they manage to pull it off.


What do you think separates This Is Hardcore from other punk and hardcore fests happening around the US?

Aside from the tenure of being around from the end of Hellfest and Posi Numbers, which is now an entire generation and almost a half in hardcore terms? We tend to go the extra mile, push the envelope as to how many bands we can fit on a bill, how many kids we can push into a room and how wide of a berth we allow this is hardcore to become to encompass as many bands from multiple periods and parts of hardcore's past and present while maintaining the basic core values of your average hall rental show.
Do you attend other fests (either here or internationally) and get a feel for how others do things and maybe apply it to how TIHC is run?

The basis of TIHC was to not do what others mentioned above had done and sorta bring it back to the basics. this was in 2006 mind you, since then we've been through 8 fest and are on the eve of our 9th and evolution has pushed us above the pack and into the forerunner spot. This is because many things and none of which is based on my attendance at other fests. I would attribute the success to the fest to the support given to it and me from the bands, labels and scene at large.
The reciprocal relationship that allows TIHC  to make the moves and bring in the bands because the support is there is really how we stay afloat.

When do you generally start planning each year's TIHC Fest, and can you give a basic outline of how and when things happen?  Do you have a schedule or playbook sort of organization to putting all the pieces together each year?

Lineup sets the precedence for many aspects but ultimately the template from year to year is adjusted based on what works and what didn't last year. This year we are looking at 62 bands, 72 if you count the side stage and nearly 100 if you count the after parties.
next year will see less bands overall but more time and different aspects evolving to make the fest less of an over exhausting experience.
Having the set players in the staff from production, to stage manager to online team really have crafted the fest into something that runs year round based on the timing in which we confirm bands and the deadlines set by us to get announcments together.
although a year of stress, the sillyness that unfolds keeps the work from being too daunting.

How many people do you have helping you with each year's event and what sorts of roles do they play in supporting you?
 
I have Greg Daly who is not only one of the premier tour managers in the underground, but one of the most solid punk figures in all aspects. His ideas, zeal for keeping things simple and punk while very professional really have made a difference in the way the fest interfaces with the bands.
Dan Oesterich from Brooklyn being our stage guy really has made the stage and turn arounds flawless.
Having Andrew Memphis Murphy as tech support on stage for the last 8 years makes each sets changeover effortless for the bands.
Chris X being the ubiquitious online figure as well as maintaining a positive relations with all of our vendors in merch land really helps on a daily basis and takes a huge workload day of during the fest off of my back.
Liam O being the coordinator for all food vendors is another key aspect of the growing fest. from having a great relationship with the city food inspectors to knowing the paperwork and having excellent taste and choices in what the kids want, its a job I couldn't do in a million years.
Joel Murphy is my silent partner. Whether its any of the above aspects or his amazing art and web design that make the presence of TIHC stand out and above, he is the rock and guidance that allows me to call at 3 am with an assortment of questions or thoughts to ponder. He comes up and directs all of the tents going up and coming down and is very hands on during the fest and makes the need to do things happen.
Sunny Singh evolved from the guy who videos to the promotional minded bedfellow to the staffer with insight towards booking leads, the social media presence of the fest along with the good natured sillyness that makes what we present online what it is.

The team this year also included Meghan Harper who is an amazing person with insane eye for detail and had alot of hands on time in compiling data for the app and sites as well as input as to ideas for the lineup. It was nice for someone to come in and take the place of Bob Wilson who moved to Florida to start FYA fest .

Jen Reisberg worked on alot of PR elements and maintained a social connection to the many sites that we depend on to talk about the fest.
Brooke Hoffman aids in most anything we need her to and is someone to always count on for a solid opinion.
Bob Shedd who worked through being a father and an relenteless work schedule put us on the map with a few companies that we now have solid relations with. Although his time is limited, he is a great idea guy and a solid team player.
Vanessa D is our newest member and someone who will be developing our own PR team year round to help keep the momentum going and give us more insights and push through the off season and such. Her drive and energy is unreal and she is going to get us places we've never been before.

Big shout outs to the support given to us still from Sean Agnew of R5 productions, a brother, mentor and most helpful person alive.
The staff of the Electric Factory really come into their own during the fest and their professionalism gives us blue ribbon level of support to the bands and customer service for the kids.


TIHC is pretty infamous for the videos you put together each year advertising the Fest.  They're pretty long and usually pretty funny.  Is this something you usually come up with, or a group project?

Sunny and I are the parents but with the coming fall and new projects, we have included everyone including Bananye West, Thomas Oi and a slew of meme making hooligans to bring the TIHC humor to an all time high. 

Are there bands that approach you each year that you would like to have play but for one reason or another (financial or schedules) it doesn't work out?  Are there band that you approach each year that you really want to have play (like dream line-up stuff) but it never works out?

Burn, Chokehold, and xDisciplexAD would make my top of my wish list. Ignite is the last hold out of semi active bands that I need to have on the fest .
Hatebreed was up there but they've now done everything but TIHC so its taken the glimmer out. I prefer solid headliners that are currently kicking ass dabbling lightly with reunions and supporting the working bands today over a reunion fest top to bottom. In the coming years you will see more lineups like this year and that is due entirely because in the past 5 years, every fest ours included have depleted the "OH MY GOD" level bands that kids would die to see.
Additionally, are there any bands you'd really like to have play some year, but they might not quite fit the style of TIHC?  Like maybe some very non-hardcore type band that you're a big fan of?
 
Obituary, Behemoth, Jedi Mind Tricks, House of Pain, Every Time I Die.  Aside from that I'd like to bring things back to when hc kids were truly supportive of the undergound movement over short winded popular trends. I could book any number of flavor of the month fad bands and kids would be happy, but a long time legend like KRS One would be a long shot as to reaching the core audience.
What's the most difficult part of putting together each years TIHC fest?
 
Not giving up. Not being downtrodden by complaints. Wanting a band and having to push the limits of what we can spend just to accomodate them so we know the kids are getting their moneys worth.
I wish I could figure a way to make the payment for bands more equal, keep production high and lower ticket prices..
Money is the root of all the evil in this and in dealing with it, I choose often to make less and less so the fest gets what it needs and everyone walks away happy. Its not a solid business plan, but it makes sense to do it this way.
 
Any big additions/changes, or otherwise exciting things you'd like to mention about this years Fest coming up in July?

Thursday Killswitch is playing alot of Older material
Friday Stephen Brodsky is playing with Converge
Bl'ast has cancelled and Agnostic Front has taken their place.
Alpha Omega has dropped so we've filled the spot with Palehorse
Sunday Madball plays set it off top to bottom with matt henderson flying in to perform with them.
 
Thanks for the love and support!
 

Tuesday, July 8, 2014

DIALYSIS GIGS THIS SUMMER


Us old farts will be playing a handful of shows out of town this Summer (and in town as well), including a special rare show from Hex alumni LIKE WOLVES in Rochester on August 3rd.  A couple more may pop up before the heat is through, but this is the hub bub as of now:

Friday, July 18th 
Bethleham, PA @ Podrum Mahenzi
doors 7, bands 8
$5-7

Dying - http://dyingxvx.com/

To Tremble - http://totremble.bandcamp.com/

Dialysis


 https://www.facebook.com/events/242424722619851/
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Saturday, July 19th- Philly.  Watching Nothing and Iron Lung, scro'...  unless someone wants to hook up a day time matinee? 
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Monday, July 21st
Syracuse, NY
Westcott Community Center
8:30PM. $7

Spoken word/comedy/juggling/deep stuff from TRIAL's
GREG BENNICK
with music from:
EGO DESTROYS (Syracuse)
DIALYSIS (more Syracuse)
VITAL TIMES (how much Syracuse can you take?)


 https://www.facebook.com/events/640686826024580/
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Friday, July 25th
Binghamton, NY
Fitzie's Irish Pub
8:00pm doors 8:30 start
21+ $5

*Bleak (Syracuse)
--http://ihatebleak.bandcamp.com/

*Hell Mary (New Jersey)
--http://hellmary.bandcamp.com/

*Dialysis (Syracuse)

*Chasing Sokaris (Massena, NY)
--http://chasingsokarisny.bandcamp.com/

*Bubba Crumrine (Ithaca Underground, Mouth to Mouth to Mouth, Brian!, Hiroshima Vacation)
--http://localshakes.org/?p=822


 https://www.facebook.com/events/1509317992616715/
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Sunday, August 3rd
Rochester, NY @ Bug Jar

DOORS @ 3 SHOW AT 4 OVER BY 730

SOUL CONTROL
LIKE WOLVES
FLIPSHIT
DIALYSIS
JAPANESE FURNACE

 

Thursday, June 26, 2014

REVIEWS FOR JUNE!

I go away for a little over a week and all these killer new records just make it known they exist in a very loud and awesome way.  So I had already been listening to a few of them, and other ones I knew were coming to beat the doors down.  But yeah, did Spring end and Summer begin with a storm of great releases.  Those of the heavy, noisy, and weird variety making some waves for me.  So read on music junkies and behold the lot this time around.



ANIMAL LOVER, “Guilt” LP
People around town kept telling me, ‘you’d love this band’, or ‘this is a band that’s right up your alley’.  Apparently, I have a type.  Well, I finally saw them, and they were right, I do like this band.  They were, in fact, one of the loudest three-piece bands I’d ever seen.  But not in that sort of grating, ‘this is actually punishing’ sort of way.  They had their sound so tight and dialed in, and then just cranked the shit out of it that it straight just pierced my skull.  Not a bad first impression.  Their newest offering “Guilt” is on LP, but it’s only 6 songs so it’s more of an EP than a full length, even though a few songs get kind of lengthy.  And that, I feel, is Animal Lover’s only downside- they tend to jam out a bit too much for a band that has very, very strong comparisons to Jesus Lizard, early Shellac, and Big Black (except with a live drummer).  Their thick, rubbery bass bounces around while guitars skree and grate over drunken yelped vocals…  yeah, I can get into that.  Fuck, even this album is really loud.  These dudes really know how to make a hell of a racket. (Learning Curve Records)

AS YOU WERE #3
Another edition of this semi-new and very awesome comics anthology.  Most of the contributors this time are the same as the last issue, most of them being pretty awesome, a few being total duds.  The theme of this issue is ‘big changes’.  So each artist interpreted that as they saw fit, from comics about punks becoming parents, to simply going from being into one type of music to another, or one’s dwindling frequency of attending shows due to adult responsibilities.  Heck, Liz Suburbia offers a literal interpretation by submitting a story about seeing a band whose music is so gnarly that she literally changes into a giant wolf that consumes the Earth.  The cover is by Lauren Denitzio and, honestly, I don’t get the adulation of her artwork.  This is basically a drawing of a bland living room (the exception being the Mission Of Burma record sitting next to a shelf) and her trademark use of newspaper clippings as a background.  Meh.  Good thing the contents on the inside make this worth picking up.  (Silver Sprocket)

AUSTERITY PROGRAM, THE, “ Beyond Calculation”
Two guys and a drum machine making a lot of noise.  Heck, they’ve been at it for years and are really damn good at it too.  The heirs to the throne of Big Black.  The make no qualms about their drum machine sounding like a drum machine and utilizing it as the machine that it is.  It gives their music a slightly industrial and robotic feel.  Meanwhile, they hoot and howl with grated guitars and nerd away in their studio bunker, making sure every little sound is fine-tuned and labored over to utmost perfection.  Steve Albini fan club charter members here.  Of all their output to date this is probably their best representation to date, and self-released on their own label.  (Controlled Burn)

EYEHATEGOD, s/t
I’ll admit that I have never been an exceptionally die-hard fan of Eyehategod.  I booked them twice- once was an awful experience where I saw their scummiest side upset my naive little brain.  The other was a pleasant experience that had them at their sunniest, apparently coaxed by beer, pizza, and meeting their desired guarantee with no issues.  I only have one of their other records and find most of it to be too fixated on the feedback and noise they love so much.  Yeah, I know.  It’s their thing so why should I complain about it?  Anyway, some 14 years later they bounce back with a fucking vicious slab of sludge filth that finds them at their absolute best.  I don’t know what switch flicked in my pea brain to find this particular record so godamned good after having a half-hearted reaction to the rest of their catalog.  The recording is stellar- it meshes the best parts of their scuzz-sludge noise assault with some harsh clarity to make for complete outlaw, scumbag music.  The band is totally focused and firing on all cylinders, whether it’s the opening punk-infused drive of “Agitation!  Propaganda!”, or the pained stop-start riff-fest of “No One Told Me”.  The A-side has a bit more kick to it overall than the B-side, which works the beaten-down, slow burn feedback downpour angle a bit more.  But whatever, I’ll take it all.  This is truly dangerous music for desperate criminals who have lost all faith in humanity, created by lifers of that exact same lot.  Damaging music.  (Housecore)

GRIDLINK, “Longhenna”
I had planned on reviewing this last time around, but forgot, which is stupid because this is a stupid good record.  So I’m a huge fan of “The Inalienable Dreamless” by Discordance Axis.  It basically sets an untouchable standard for just how weird, inventive, and fast grindcore can be played.  Their vocalist, Jon Chang, has a very distinctive style that I really admired (as well as a totally off-the-wall stage presence if you ever had the good fortune to see one of their rare live appearances).  That being said, he heads up this international grind unit and I’m naturally going to be interested in anything he does musically.  This is actually Gridlink’s second (and, apparently, final) record, which contains the core of his previous endeavor Haiyano Daisuki.  Again, super fast, very slickly produced, and full of wild guitar leads.  It’s like future music for ADHD-riddled video game freaks, minus any electronic elements.  Just the fastest music imaginable, minus any of the sloppiness or scuzz that accompanies most grind bands.  This is played by perfectionists.  So I still like Discordance Axis better but they’re different animals and this is, by no means, a bad turn.  It’s a fitting end to a good project.  (Handshake Inc.)

HELMS ALEE/YOUNG WIDOWS split 12”
So these two bands team up once again on a longer format?  Well, not exactly.  Ben from Helms Alee’s old band, Harkonen, did a split 7” with Young Widows previous incarnation as Breather Resist and the results for both sets current band produce similar results.  For Young Widows they are definitely an album band.  When they do shorter offerings (like 7”s or splits) I feel like they’re pulling from their pile of rejected songs.  It’s not to say the three songs they have here are not good, they just don’t have the heft and same thought-out execution of grand ideas (or as much pedal experimentation) they present on their LPs.  These songs are a bit more straight ahead and rocking than other material they have.  Helms Alee, though, knock it out of the park.  “Punchy Stabby” starts things off with a twisting and knotty riff that carries through this ripper.  “PAN” is next, and offers up the meandering and melodic side of the group, while closer, “Gas Giant” continues the meandering until a massive riff explodes from the ether and swallows the song whole ‘til it fades into oblivion.  The HA side wins this one.  A bit dismayed at the lack of packaging on this sucker.  Just a neat cover drawing, and no insert or info about the songs, recordings, lyrics, or otherwise.  (Sargent House)

HINDSIGHT, “Draining Satellites” EP
If I could call up the meme of the smiling dude with cornrows and add my own text, “I heard you like hardcore, so I put some hardcore in your hardcore to make it more hardcore” I’d place that here instead of an actual review.  It would get the point across.  These are some Pittsburgh dudes who are clearly having a good time revisiting their favorite memories of Trial and other mid-to-late 90’s hardcore styles.  I mean, just get a load of their name and their record title!  I lived through this stuff man, I know my 90’s hardcore worship when I hear it.  If this doesn’t turn your small t-shirt into an XL ringer than you’re not listening.  Regardless, they do a decent job of it, throwing down seven tracks of multiple breakdowns, lots of chugging rocking, and sing-alongs.  You will mosh.  You will (most likely) bleach your hair as well after hearing this.  (Hindsight)

PUP, s/t
Not since the 90’s have I been swayed to see a band or purchase their record based upon a music video as an introduction to their music.  Pup are my 120 minutes (or Headbangers Ball) moment of 2014.  Of course, both videos they have made (which are insane, by the way, look them up) are for two of the best songs on this LP.  Opener “Guilt Trip” rides a swinging beat with a wacky guitar lick looping over it and wild sing-along chants, while the next song, “Reservoir” takes a ripping punk rocker and inserts even more song-along madness to the mix.  From there it gets to be fairly consistent with songs like “Dark Days”, “Lionheart”, “Back Against the Wall” and “Mabu” all having a similar feel- upbeat punk, catchy riffs and licks, and sung/yelled melodic vocals and gang vocals.  Nothing wrong with any of that, but I like the songs where they’re going against the grain and doing something different, like “Guilt Trip” and the painfully beautiful and post-hardcore leaning “Cul-De-Sac” to separate them from the pack.  Nevertheless, Pup are a really fun band that take some of the more fun moments of Weezer and toss them into a blender with bands like Flatliners and Fucked Up.  (SideOneDummy)

YOUNG WIDOWS, “Easy Pain”
The A-side of Young Widows fourth LP may be some of the best stuff they’ve ever done.  Each of the first four songs is a separate, awesome entity.  “Godman” opens things up with a huge, crushing collapse of haywire intent moving at sloth speed.  “Cool Night” demonstrates how the band can take chaos and present it in a pretty and smooth way before Evan Patterson comes in with that closing epic guitar ascension while crooning “ease the pain” over and over.  “Kerosene Girl” picks up the pace and burns the house down before they’re even halfway through the record.  The first closes out with “Doomed Moon”, quite possibly one of my favorite YW songs ever.  It opens with a looped whisper of guitar, adding up until it’s a simple little whistle.  And then it just gets completely smashed by Nick Thineman’s pulverizing bass, turning the whole thing into a repetitive lumbering beast while Evan’s guitar abuse wails all around it with calculated skronks of noise tear through the mess (and that constant little background loop).  It’s quite incredible.  Not to say the B-side is a dud.  “Bird Feeder” might be one of their most sleazy-sounding songs they have written.  “Gift Of Failure” and “King Sol” are top notch additions to the band’s catalog, but add in a consistent way, and not necessarily as the pick of the litter.  All in all and great record that successfully combines the inventiveness and wild nature of “Old Wounds” with the moody and reserved weight of “In and Out Of Youth and Lightness” (Temporary Residence)

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

OFF TO SEATTLE

Going on vacation for a little over a week.  The Northwest calls for me once more.  Hoping to see old pals, new sights, and lots of Mighty-O Donuts.  Seattle/Portland area give me some good stuff.